yummy fiber garden gummies

I’m not sure if its a boy thing or a kid thing, or both; but I have a son (and husband) that hate their greens and fruits.

Well, ok, not entirely true. Wun would take vegetables if its placed in front of him but he’s quite happy to be more a carnivore than omnivorous. Q on the other hand, will eat some fruits and some vegetables but you can never tell with that kid. He’d wolf down a whole bowl of porridge and pick out the little green bits. But on other times, snack happily on strawberries. 

I know of some bento-savvy mummies that style the vegetables and fruits into funky and cute things to entice their kids and husbands to eat more fiber but which I craft, I was never very good with cutesy.

Anyway, like most moms, I fret about my kids’ pooping regularly and chanced upon Fiber Garden Gummies the other day and decided to buy a box for Q who is a big gummy fan. The gummies, which are packed in 4g sachets, are sugar and preservatives free also come with added Xylitol for oral health (same stuff in those edible toothpastes  kids use).  According to the insert, we need 4g+your age worth of fiber per day; which means one pack a day should keep Q’s fiber woes away. Not that we replace his vegetables and fruits but sometimes that poor little fella has problems, em, well, pooping.

The first day I brought the gummies back our little friend ate three packs (one mummy sanctioned, two unauthorized self helped) and later that day… boy, oh boy… did we receive a HUGE deposit of youknowwhat.

We’ve cut back this gummy business to maybe once every few days and it seems to work its magic. Gotta give it two thumbs up!

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Paradox of our time

The recent case of the Ferrari that rammed into the hapless taxi has caused a huge outcry and debate about affluence, racism, entitlement and a whole lot more.

It beckons wondering about the onslaught of capitalism, materialism and more on the physical state of our generation, the moral state of our humanity and it makes the parent in me deathly worried for the future of my sons.

Paradox of Our Times: Dr. Bob Moorehead 
We have taller buildings, but shorter tempers;
Wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints.
We spend more time, but have less;
We buy more, but enjoy it less.
We have bigger houses and smaller families;
More conveniences but less time;

We have more degrees but less sense;
more knowledge, but less judgment;
more experts, but more problems;
more medicine, but less wellness.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly;
laugh too little, drive too fast;get mad too quickly, stay up too late, get up too tired.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values;
We talk too much, love too seldom and lie too often.
We’ve learned how to make a living but not a life.
We’ve added years to life, not life to years.
We’ve been all the way to the moon and back,
but have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor.
We’ve conquered outer space but not inner space.
We’ve done larger things but not better things,
We’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul.
We’ve split the atom but kept our prejudices whole.
We write more, but learn less.
We plan more but accomplish less.
We learned to rush, but not to wait.
We have higher incomes but lower morals.
We have more food, but less taste,
We build more computers to hold more information,
to produce more copies than ever; but we have less communication.
We have become long on quantity, but short on equality.

These are times of fast foods and slow digestion;
tall men and short character; steep profits and shallow relationships.
These are the times of world peace, but domestic warfare;
more leisure and less fun; more kinds of food but less nutrition.

These are the days of two incomes but more divorce; of fancier houses, but broken homes.
These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality,
one night stands; overweight bodies and pills
that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill.

These are days in which we can choose to stand up and make a difference
or pretend that we never heard these cries at all.

My third mother’s day

I’ve not had the chance to catch my breath since the year started. And these past few weeks has, if possible, seen my schedule rise from “crazy bad” to “nutcase” status.

Yes, I work from home, an arrangement I’m able to have cos I run my own company. Yes, it’s a big luxury because I still get to be with my two boys and oversee the house personally. Yes, it means I get to hang with my kids and do all the fun stuff SAHMs get to do. Yes, I have live in help these days ( I didn’t till Q was about 18 months old) and that has most certainly made life a tad easier.

But what working-from-home-moms don’t tell you is the sheer lack of sleep you get, the virtual zero personal time you get and the fact that you are on the go-go-go all time. And I do mean, ALL the time. When I’m not sorting Quentin out l, I’m answering emails, or I’m tending to Evan or working on a proposal for a client. In between, I plan playdates, go on excursions with the kids, meet my colleagues and pow wow with W (the husband) cos, well, we also jointly run his company.

Anyway, my fatigue level has been climbing and I broke out in rashes just before mother’s day weekend. My left ear sprout a ring of eczema when my body is kinda teetering over (my great grand mother had the same thing, as so my sisters) and i’ve always regarded it as my body’s own warning bell to slow down. I’ve never had full blown rashes before though and with all that HFMD going on I hauled myself to the doctor right and early on Saturday.

To cut the long story short, it turns out to be exhaustion related rashes and we made a quip about my not being able to enforce an MC, he gave me some cream and ordered me to rest plenty before my body fully and truly gives out on me.

And so we canned all our plans (luncheons, meet ups, meetings…) as far as we could Si that I could REST. My folks happen to drop by so I felt a lil better that Q got some serious playtime (my

mom is great at entertaining Q). I took a dose of magnesium (yay to my osteopath) and called it an early night where thanks to my helper stepping up at watch Evan at night, I had my first solid six hours of sleep in over a year.

Mother’s Day started uneventfully too. I slept through several alarms according to W and after Sunday school today, we all (four of us!) unceremoniously crashed out for close to four hours. We decided against battling the crowds and opted to cook (W cooked, Q supervised while I played with E).

And as I write this, Evan is sleeping on my chest, curled up like a little furball and smelling all baby, Q is watching a show with W and the rest of the house is quiet.

Yes, i have a mountain of work and an early start to my tomorrow. But for now, life could not get any better.
Happy Mother’s Day. 🙂

Raising an unscreened child? Nah…

I know of some friends that feel quite strongly that kids user the age of three should be unscreened. That is, they should not be allowed TV, computers, smart phone devices or technology like the iPad. They cite expert recommendations against the practice and there have been much debate on the matter.

And while I do believe that toddlers should most certainly not be given that much of said stuff, I and my technology loving husband, really find introducing these things to Q (and Evan when he’s a lil older) is not only quite alright with us, but something important given that they are mainstays in the future that he’s going to be growing up in.

So, yes, we allow Q to use the iPad/iphone/ipod and he gets a fair (but limited) amount of TV time too. In fact, since daddy upgraded to the iPad 2, Q even scored his very own iPad- all filled with apps that we have curated, reviewed and tried out ourselves and shows. No less, the iPad has been a god sent on our travels with Q seeing as it duly entertains him on board flights and on those long road trips between destinations we always end up having to endure.

We do have rules, of course. Like, he does not get the iPad (or the like) till past 4pm and when he does get to have screen time, its (kinda) supervised. I monitor the shows he gets to watch (I rather he watch on our home system than on TV, for example cos there are no ads), the apps he gets to play (since I pick them). And of course, we calibrate the brightness on the devices and enforce how far he has to sit to watch TV.

Our kids are growing up in a different era; a time where technology is not a luxury but a part of life. A time where learning and childhood is markedly different from any other generation. While we parents grew up in an age where “swipe technology” was a fantastical concept (remember how and improbable we thought it when we watched it in Minority Report), its a reality in our world today. The same Today our children are growing up in.

To the parents- and experts, that scoff at the validity and soundness of what we are doing since, you know, we all grew up not having technology and were perfectly happy playing with wooden toys and climbing trees, let me just put things in perspective: last time mullets were in and policemen wore shorts.